buckets b-sides: Exciting News

‘buckets’ is a very unprescribing script. As part of the pre-text, Adam Barnard writes that “Everything’s an option”. He gives you permission to change the gender and pronouns of characters; leaves lines without punctuation for you to make your own decisions, and allows you to perform the play with ‘any number and composition of actors’. This playfulness in the text is part of what attracted us to the play in the first place – allowing us to keep within the same realm as Base Layer but working with a published play.

When doing some research about the play and reading reviews about other companies who had taken on the production, I came across an article in Exeunt Magazine which mentioned the ‘buckets b-sides’ scenes written by Barnard but not published in the final production or script, and the opportunity to apply for your own. I’m not sure I registered what this would mean at first, but I mentioned it to Lucy and Tamsin and they thought it was very cool, so I re-read the article and looked through the first few pages of my script again, and sure enough at the bottom of the page, below the ‘Thanks to’:

For your very own limited-edition bonus scene from the ‘buckets’ b-sides collection, apply to… an email address for Adam himself

So, on Tuesday afternoon, we sent off an email to the playwright. We explained about the origins of Theatre of Minds, sent him a link to the blog, and asked (thinking it was a bit of a long-shot) about the b-sides. We also included a PS asking about why his title is uncapitalised, as this is something we have been greatly intrigued by.

Then, on Wednesday after rehearsals, we came home to a reply. We are SO EXCITED to announce that our production of ‘buckets’ will include TWO limited-edition scenes from the b-sides – one of which has never been read or performed by anyone else before!!! I couldn’t wait to tell the cast on Thursday morning but waited to do it in person because it was so huge! In fact, Thursday saw the staging of our first new scene called ‘Birthday’

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Rehearsing ‘Birthday’: the first of our b-sides

The reply from Adam was better than anything we could have expected. He had looked at the blog and seen our first Rehearsal Video Diary, which was incredible news, and gave us such a lovely, detailed reply to the question about the title which I would love to share with you:

Why the lower-case title? Hard to explain except that it was a strong instinct from the off. The original plan for the play had been to write a more conventional character-led narrative called Bucket List (I didn’t know there was a mediocre Hollywood film of the same name) about a girl called Melly who knows she’s going to die young, and her family etc. I’d been given a bursary to write this play for a children’s theatre but I realised early in the process I was writing the wrong play. It felt mawkish, sentimental, exploitative. Why had I even pitched it, I wondered? It wasn’t a personal connection – I don’t (mercifully) have any experience of a terminally ill child. I tried to uncover what had led me to this curious pitch for a play I couldn’t write, and I realised I was interested in our relationship with time, in the different ways and rates at which we do or don’t grow up, in mental health as well as physical illness… The life-limited child was really a metaphor for the things I wanted to explore – not a subject. I was furious with myself. To let off steam I started to write little scenes – vignettes – snatches of dialogue – that were more what I wanted to explore. Somehow these scenes took a life of their own. Each scene (and, I figured, each life) was its own little container – hence, buckets. I liked the everyday mundanity of the word and the image (and suddenly the object itself seemed to be everywhere I looked). The whole thing seemed less self-important with a lower-case b, less like a Proclamation or Answer, less final. A fragment of a thought rather than the beginning and end of one. Maybe a little more comical. The way I came to the play was pretty haphazard – it wasn’t like I sat down with the title and a plan – if anything I was rebelling against my original pitch – and somehow decapitalising (is that a word?) reflected this. Maybe also a nod to the writer debbie tucker green, who I really admire, and who is basically allergic to capitals.

Thankyou so much to Adam Barnard for his time and insight into the play – it has made this week very memorable for all of us involved. We are so excited to be presenting a play with a completely unique script, in a form that no-one has even read before, and I feel so grateful to have the opportunity to tell this story with these people.

Tickets for ‘buckets’ are now available via the Abbey Theatre. In order to make a donation to Young Minds after the performances we need to raise some funds beforehand to pay the licensing fee for the play and for props/costumes. Any contributions at www.gofundme.com/theatreofminds-buckets will be gratefully received, but if you can’t donate please share the link and help us spread the word of the project.

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A Summer of Theatre: A Monster Calls

As well as working on ‘buckets‘ this summer, I have another little, personal project for the three months before third year. I am trying to see as much theatre as I possibly can, so the aim is to go and see something at the theatre every week that I am in the UK until I go back to uni. Some things are booked way in advance (Hamilton is the last week of August and I could not be more excited!) But I also want to be spontaneous and book last minute tickets when I have a spare evening (if anyone wants to come with me one week, drop me a message 😉 ) So, I thought I’d document this little journey with a post after each show – hopefully I’ll be able to keep this up once rehearsals get started!!

A Monster Calls

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Date: Tuesday 10th July 2018
Creators: Patrick Ness and Sally Cookson
Venue: The Old Vic
First Performed: June 2018, Bristol Old Vic

Patrick Ness was one of my favourite authors at around age 14 – I loved the Chaos Walking Trilogy and when I read A Monster Calls, it wasn’t at all what I was expecting but it opened me up to a whole new genre of story. Admittedly I have been meaning to see the film starring Liam Neeson (who will always be referred to as Qui Gon Jinn I’m afraid) since it came out, but have never quite got round to it. So when I was researching this summer of theatre I knew this had to be on the list.

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A Monster Calls tells the story of Conor, a thirteen year old boy living with his Mum. They have managed just fine together since his dad moved to America, but now his mum is very sick and doesn’t look like she’s going to get better. Conor has a recurring nightmare, but one night it is interrupted at 12:07 by a monster coming to his window. The monster is only awakened for matters of life and death; he tells 3 tales and then Conor must face his fears and tell his own story – tell the truth. Despite having a strong magical element, the emotional story of the play is very easy to connect and empathise with – ending with an audience in floods of tears.

The piece was much more physical and stylised than I first realised. The use of ropes to create the great Yew tree in Conor’s back garden was brilliant – really bringing the magic to life by using an every day object in a new way. The texture mirrored the twists and knots in the bark, and careful weight-bearing allowed actors to climb up and peer down from among the branches. The rope stretched beyond the tree itself to become a seat belt in the car, a baby wrapped in swaddling and a crown , which is why the unveiling of a giant ledge at the climax of the play fell a little flat for me. Whether it was the view from our £10 seats or not, I felt like I wanted them to use the material they had developed through the piece in the culmination of the story – but that might also just be a taste thing.

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The cast formed a beautiful ensemble – all on stage the majority of the time, using their bodies to create the roots of the trees and to assist the monster in his storytelling. Each actor had a more featured role, but the ensemble work was so tight that I often didn’t notice the individual faces – I don’t remember seeing the actor playing Conor’s dad in any of the ensemble sequences, although he must have been there! Despite the gorgeous physical theatre sequences within the performance, it was in fact the stillness that really stood out to me. The show ended with a couple of minutes of complete stillness on stage, and Matthew Tennyson as Conor could command the space by standing there with everything happening around him.

The stage was a blank canvas of white, with the live band visible in a hatch on the top right of the back wall, fully part of the performance. Simple wooden chairs formed the basis of the set, moved by the ensemble to create the different locations, joined by extra features like a giant, swinging pendulum of a grandfather clock giving a more non-naturalistic feel, mirroring the mystical nature of the story. Rooms were changed with a grid of light, bringing one area of the stage to life at a time, and projections on the back wall featured an array of clocks depending on Conor’s location. It felt like a very cohesive design, mixing the realism of the world Conor was living in with the magical world of the monster.

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Conor’s morning routine was depicted early on in the play with a sequence, which has already inspired one of the transitions in ‘buckets’. The piece was very emotional, and really made me think about using contemporary theatre styles within a production lead predominantly by story and character relationships. “Stories are wild creatures, the monster said. When you let them loose, who knows what havoc they might wreak?”

A Monster Calls plays at The Old Vic until 25th August 2018. Tickets available

 

Rehearsals Week 2

By Tamsin Sandford-Smith

Following last week’s workshopping and exploration of the text, the past three days have been very exciting for all of us, as some of the more specific aspects of our production have started to take shape. The lovely people at the Abbey Theatre have enabled us to move very early in rehearsals into our actual performance space, which has made everything suddenly seem much more immediate! Despite some initial difficulties in turning the lights on in the studio (!) it has been hugely beneficial to be able to spend time time thinking about our relationship as actors with the space and the audience, planning entrances, exits and moments of direct address.

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Flo and Hannah

Wednesday also saw the completion of the “buckets” cast, as we were joined by the wonderful Flo Rowntree! Inevitably, during a rehearsal process the company slowly becomes closer, but the atmosphere in Theatre of Minds is so supportive that the devising process has really felt like a team effort, with all of us drawing on different experiences of home and university to contribute to discussion of the creative process. The net of relationships and friendships developing between us has also helped me to consider the interwoven relationships of our characters: one of the most innovative things about Adam Barnard’s play is the opportunity it gives us to construct our own characters and narrative tracts. The brilliantly eclectic nature of his fragmented scenes also means that rehearsals are never dull – we can move straight from discussions about the nature of time and mortality to detailed exploration of how to move like a Minecraft avatar!

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Beth and Tamsin

As well as tickets going on sale through the Abbey Theatre website, we will shortly be unveiling our production promo design. Plus we have an incredibly exciting announcement cast members received this week, which is so secret that I have been told it will be having its own blog post! At a time when leaving school means that there have been a lot of “lasts” in my life, creating something new through “buckets” has been hugely refreshing and has been helping me to look forward to the future, as well as remembering the journey that has led us all to Theatre of Minds. With that in mind, I am definitely looking forward to continuing rehearsals next week, and I hope that you continue to follow us on social media for regular updates and lots of Instagram stories!

Tickets for ‘buckets’ are now available via the Abbey Theatre. In order to make a donation to Young Minds after the performances we need to raise some funds beforehand to pay the licensing fee for the play and for props/costumes. Any contributions at www.gofundme.com/theatreofminds-buckets will be gratefully received, but if you can’t donate please share the link and help us spread the word of the project.

An exploration of Time: New Beginnings

By Mae Lankshear (cast member of ‘buckets’ and ‘Base Layer’)

After the two weeks of rehearsals for ‘buckets’, the theme of time in a variety of forms has cropped up in both theatrical discussions involving the piece and in conversation amongst the cast, especially considering myself and a few other members have completed our A Levels and are preparing to move away from home and onto university. As potentially the biggest change I have experienced in my life so far, it has unsurprisingly provoked anxiety regarding the multitude off unknown factors as I venture into a new city with new people by myself which is undoubtedly daunting and ultimately terrifying. While ‘buckets’ considers time macro-cosmically, the pressure of time has been prominent for me in a microcosmic sense, the days of summer counting down until I must say a non permanent goodbye to the familiar and experience a series of lasts before I turn the page onto a new chapter of adult life. I almost feel as if I am floating in a liminal space between childhood and adulthood, feeling desperately unprepared for life outside my comfort zone but being forced to confront that fear and work it out for myself.

However, engaging with Adam Barnard’s ‘buckets’ in a more detailed sense throughout the first rehearsals I have realised how universal the play truly is, exploring childhood and adulthood as a complex concept which is accessible for any age group. Through a cast activity of writing down our initial impression of the play’s thematic concepts, the presentation of contradictions became particularly prominent to me. Barnard often presents one message in one scene then completely contradicting the message later on in the narrative. Amongst the interwoven erratic scenes which meditate on mortality and humanity there is an underlying acceptance of lack of rules and structure, reflected in the narrative style as well as the thematic content. As I approach my new endeavours, I will certainly take this with me: the fact that life doesn’t have to be formulated and judged on perfection. There is no doubt that I may come across troubles and problems when I live alone but that is part of the beauty of life and it isn’t something to be scared of. Although I will miss the life I have here at home, I have come to terms with and accepted that home will always be a constant and I am exited by the new opportunities higher education and a new city can offer me and embracing what life hands to me.

Although only a few rehearsals in with still a huge amount of exploration to go, ‘buckets’ has taught me not to be satisfied by standing still, appreciating the present without being hindered by obsessive nostalgia and dreaming while living in the moment. It is a complex and confusing yet thoughtful and touching exploration of humanity both in portrayal and intent, showing the audience life as a variety of portraits of raw honesty.

Tickets for ‘buckets’ are now available via the Abbey Theatre. In order to make a donation to Young Minds after the performances we need to raise some funds beforehand to pay the licensing fee for the play and for props/costumes. Any contributions at www.gofundme.com/theatreofminds-buckets will be gratefully received, but if you can’t donate please share the link and help us spread the word of the project.

Rehearsal Video Diary

buckets – First Rehearsals

 

Tickets for ‘buckets’ are now available via the Abbey Theatre. In order to make a donation to Young Minds after the performances we need to raise some funds beforehand to pay the licensing fee for the play and for props/costumes. Any contributions at www.gofundme.com/theatreofminds-buckets will be gratefully received, but if you can’t donate please share the link and help us spread the word of the project.

A Summer of Theatre: Heathers

As well as working on ‘buckets‘ this summer, I have another little, personal project for the three months before third year. I am trying to see as much theatre as I possibly can, so the aim is to go and see something at the theatre every week that I am in the UK until I go back to uni. Some things are booked way in advance (Hamilton is the last week of August and I could not be more excited!) But I also want to be spontaneous and book last minute tickets when I have a spare evening (if anyone wants to come with me one week, drop me a message 😉 ) So, I thought I’d document this little journey with a post after each show – hopefully I’ll be able to keep this up once rehearsals get started!!

Heathers

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Date: Wednesday 4th July 2018
Creators: Laurence O’Keefe and Kevin Murphy
Venue: The Other Palace
First Performed: June 2018, The Other Palace, London – UK premier

My spotify history is made up almost entirely of music theatre soundtracks. Current playlists are filled with Hamilton, Come From Away and Dear Evan Hansen (I think Mean Girls is next on my list for lyrics to learn). My enthusiasm for the genre means that I rarely go to the see a staged musical without knowing most of the lyrics, or at least the plot of what happens. But this was my situation when Staise and I headed down to The Other Palace in Victoria for Heathers: aside from the four songs on spotify and the fact that is was kind of like High School Musical with murders I knew very little about it, and watching the show was so refreshing!

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Heathers is based on the 1988 film by the same name, telling the story of Veronica Sawyer as she befriends the popular Heathers and dark JD to upset the social heirachy of Westaburg High. Although light-hearted and over-exaggerated at times, the show touches delicately on themes of suicide, bullying and sexuality, encouraging acceptance and the important of honest relationships. Not knowing how the story would end (and not singing along to the songs in my head!) allowed me to escape into the world of the show and experience the storytelling from a fresh point of view – it was great and made me fall in love with the production even more.

The Other Palace is a fantastic venue, and I definitely want to go and see more work there in the future. We were right in the back row, but still so close to the stage and able to pick up on all the details of the actors’ facial expressions – something you just don’t get on the big West End stages. Director Andy Flickman used every inch of the relatively small stage to its highest potential, changing formations and changes of pace to allow two scenes to occur simultaneously.

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I was in awe of the performers on stage: the ensemble were a fantastic group of dancers, each embodying their own specific character but functioning as a well-oiled unit. It was also fantastic to see such a representative group on stage: not all stick thin blonds, but a wide variety of people who could actually portray the broad scale of a high school class. Carrie Hope Fletcher (Veronica) has always blown me away as a singer – the strength of her mid-range is amazing – but this production was definitely the best I’ve seen her act on stage. She really felt at ease with the character and the emotional turmoil she experiences; her comic timing was fab; and her confidence and determination in “Dead Girl Walking” specifically was awesome. She was joined by three fantastic Heathers, so in sync with their harmonies and choreography.

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The atmosphere in the auditorium was brilliant! It was the youngest audience I had been in for quite awhile, made up of: theatre people, the online following of Carrie and the hard core Heathers fans dressed up in their Veronica cosplay. Everyone was loving every second and the applause erupted for song after song  – the open enthusiasm was almost like seeing a show in America where standing ovations occur after nearly every performance. If the excitement in the room wasn’t enough from the show alone, the announcement of the West End transfer after the curtain call blew the roof off – it was quite emotional to be there for it seeing the passion of everyone around me.

I am now a solid Heathers fan. There are some massive female sings, and the message of inclusiveness and respect is something we should all be spreading. But I have also learnt how nice it is to go in to a theatre with no pre-conceived ideas. I want to experience more theatre in this way – it felt like I could have an honest reaction because I wasn’t expecting anything from myself or from the production.

Heathers continues its sold out run at The Other Palace until 4th August and transfers to the West End for a 12 week run on 3rd September 2018

Rehearsals Week 1

We have now come to the end of our first week of rehearsals and already there are so many ideas being bounced around. It’s been really exciting to see how everyone is interpreting the play and characters in different ways.

After a few rounds of the game Concentration (it wouldn’t be a Theatre of Minds rehearsals without playing Concentration!), we started to look at the play as a whole

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Bethan, Staise and Lucy

rather that focusing in on specific sections. Looking at the wider themes meant that we could work out what message we wanted to portray to the audience as well as helping us to solidify the themes covered in our minds.
Having looked at the play as a whole the day before, Tuesday was all about characters. Beth and I decided it would be best to roughly cast the show in this first week because then we could get to know our characters and start to look at relationships right from the start. Therefore Tuesday morning focused on our individual characters and we started to look at given circumstances for our characters by writing down everything we could tell about our characters just from the script. It was interesting as although some characters have more about them in the script than others, reading between the lines meant that everyone could understand a lot about their characters.

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After spending time on our characters, we then started to look at the transitions between several scenes and managed to come up with some initial ideas that hopefully will give us a starting point when we start blocking next week.
Our final day of rehearsals in our first week also happened to be the 3 year anniversary of this blog so we decided to celebrate with cake! In between exploring some chorus

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Beth and Lucy

scenes, we manged to make £46.27 from our homemade cakes which was the perfect birthday present for Theatre of Minds so thank you to everyone at Beaumont who kindly donated.

This week has been exhausting but so much fun and I can’t wait to be back next Wednesday for more rehearsals. In the meantime, make sure you are following us on our social media where regular posts are going out to keep you up to date with how our rehearsals are going.

 

 

Tickets for ‘buckets’ are now available via the Abbey Theatre. In order to make a donation to Young Minds after the performances we need to raise some funds beforehand to pay the licensing fee for the play and for props/costumes. Any contributions at www.gofundme.com/theatreofminds-buckets will be gratefully received, but if you can’t donate please share the link and help us spread the word of the project.

Happy Birthday Theatre of Minds

Three years ago today, Lucy set up the blog and Theatre of Minds officially launched. Since we were rehearsing today (our last day using space at Beaumont) the cast made some cakes to help us celebrate and we shared them with staff and students around the grounds, to celebrate the birthday. Thankyou so much to everyone at Beaumont for your support!

A message from Bethan (one of our lovely cast members):

It’s hard to believe that the Theatre of Minds blog turns three years old today. When I was recruited for the project around the same time the blog was created, I never anticipated the impact that it would have on me personally and the audiences who came to see our first show, Base Layer.

    Beth and Lucy run Theatre of Minds in such a way that from the start, it has felt like a group endeavour. This was, for me, one of the things that made Base Layer so special and buckets is already shaping up the same way. In the opening stages of rehearsals especially, there is no clear distinction of roles- everyone becomes both an actor and director as we experiment with different ideas to see what we all like best. Rehearsals for buckets are only two days in and we are already getting to grips with the script as a cast rather than individually working on the scenes that we speak in. The collaborative ethos of Theatre of Minds means every actor gets a say in how the whole performance is shaped, rather than simply acting their role.

   Being involved with Base Layer has been hugely influential in the way I have approached devising my own subsequent work particularly at A level. We used many different stimuli from music to movement or even a single prop to build work from which I found were useful starting points for work in class. The subject matter of mental health was particularly challenging but staging it was a brilliant way to explore the difficult emotions that surround the issue. It was very moving to see that many of our audience members were also affected by what we performed. The powerful impact that exploring a topic like mental health creatively had on both audiences and the cast was a significant factor I took into account when considering what I personally wanted to show an audience.

   When Beth and Lucy first had the idea to start a theatre company, I’m not sure they imagined the overwhelming response it would have. I’m very excited to be back working with them and a new cast on buckets and to see how each of us can put our own unique stamp on the play.

Tickets for ‘buckets’ are now available via the Abbey Theatre. In order to make a donation to Young Minds after the performances we need to raise some funds beforehand to pay the licensing fee for the play and for props/costumes. Any contributions at www.gofundme.com/theatreofminds-buckets will be gratefully received, but if you can’t donate please share the link and help us spread the word of the project.

 

Tickets for ‘buckets’

After an amazing first day of rehearsals today, we are delighted to announce that tickets are now on sale for ‘buckets’ of the Abbey Theatre website.

www.abbeytheatre.org.uk/whats-on/buckets/

The performances are at 7:30pm on Friday 7th September and Saturday 8th September in the studio at the Abbey Theatre, with tickets costing £9 and £6 for concessions. The proceeds from the performances will be donated to the charity Young Minds, to help their fight for healthy mental well-being in all young people.

We would like this opportunity to thank everyone at the Abbey Theatre for their support with this project so far, but specifically thankyou to Tina for her organisation and making all our ideas seem possible, and to Andrew for creating us an image on the webpage (our own promotional material is being designed as we speak!) The project wouldn’t be going anywhere near as smoothly without your help!

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First day of rehearsals

In order to make a donation after the performances we need to raise some funds beforehand to pay the licensing fee for the play and for props/costumes. Any contributions at www.gofundme.com/theatreofminds-buckets will be gratefully received, but if you can’t donate please share the link and help us spread the word of the project.

A Summer of Theatre: Fatherland

As well as working on ‘buckets‘ this summer, I have another little, personal project for the three months before third year. I am trying to see as much theatre as I possibly can, so the aim is to go and see something at the theatre every week that I am in the UK until I go back to uni. Some things are booked way in advance (Hamilton is the last week of August and I could not be more excited!) But I also want to be spontaneous and book last minute tickets when I have a spare evening (if anyone wants to come with me one week, drop me a message 😉 ) So, I thought I’d document this little journey with a post after each show – hopefully I’ll be able to keep this up once rehearsals get started!!

Fatherland

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Date: Saturday 23rd June 2018
Creators: Scott Graham, Karl Hyde, Simon Stephens
Theatre: Lyric Hammersmith
First Performed: July 2017, Royal Exchange, Manchester

Ever since I have been creating theatre, the work of Frantic Assembly has been a major inspiration. Their use of music and movement to evoke emotions is a style that I feel very connected with, and the broad range of actors involved in their pieces creates work which is forever changing. The company are always moving forward and creating something new, and Fatherland was no exception.

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‘Fatherland’ is a verbatim piece based on interviews with men in Stockport, Corby and Kidderminster about their relationship with their fathers’. The play focused on Scott, Karl and Simon as they heard stories about pride, love and anxiety and reflected on their relationships. The inspirations for the project were explicitly labelled in the dialogue: Cloudy with a chance of Meatballs, the 2009 animated film; Salvador Dali’s painting Gala contemplating the Mediterranean Sea; as well as the home-towns of the three creators. This was never going to be conventional, but I would be nervous about using the word ‘play’ to describe Fatherland: it was an experience as much as anything else, you had to feel the piece rather than watch it – just let it all happen around you.

Sound was an integral part of the storytelling. Musician Karl Hyde had used the words from the interviews to create an immersive soundtrack of “21st century folk songs” ranging from tribal chants and repeated mantras to close harmony chorales and gorgeous chords. The addition of the ‘Chorus of Others’ enveloped the audience in the sounds; bringing the music out to theauditorium. At times reminiscent of a football chant, the soundtrack was awesome and I was blown away by how it highlighted the important lines in previous scenes and became more of a backdrop towards the climax when the stories get more personal and the narrators begin to make their own realisations “I wouldn’t have done that”. It wasn’t what I was expecting at all, but it united the men and made these individual stories universal “I wouldn’t be doing this if it wasn’t for that”.

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Movement sequences are always a highlight of a Frantic Assembly piece of work: the physical way that their characters express their feelings is something I am always aspiring to. But here I was moved by the smooth transitions between scenes. Interweaving the different interviews, the actors playing Scott, Karl and Simon would turn together changing the shape of the stage and the focus of the scene in an instant. The set was very limited: two frames and a ladder, pulled out of the floor when needed, meaning these transitions were vital to keep the action moving along. Three men stepping from one side of the stage to the other at exactly the same time and we know the scene is moving on to a new stage.

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This was a fantastic piece of theatre to see just as we are about to start rehearsals for ‘buckets’. I could talk forever about all the things that I loved, and my mind was buzzing with ideas on the train on the way home. I love the honesty of verbatim theatre and I will definitely be striving for that raw, truthful feeling through rehearsals for ‘buckets’. The interconnected scenes and the way the movement was integrated into that was just what I needed to see to give me the confidence that ‘buckets’ would work for the style of theatre we are striving to create. But the main thing I will take away from Fatherland is the versatility of sound: I want to be brave with our music choices and utilise all of the skills of our cast to create an experience for the audience.

Fatherland played at the Lyric Hammersmith until Saturday 23rd June.